Posted by: motso | June 19, 2014

Indian Languages on Bank notes

Languagepanel (2)Here is a pictorial display of some of the Indian Languages which are printed on an Indian Rupee note

Posted by: motso | May 1, 2014

verbalizet

verbalizet

Posted by: motso | January 9, 2014

2013 in review

The WordPress.com stats helper monkeys prepared a 2013 annual report for this blog.

Here’s an excerpt:

A New York City subway train holds 1,200 people. This blog was viewed about 5,100 times in 2013. If it were a NYC subway train, it would take about 4 trips to carry that many people.

Click here to see the complete report.

Posted by: motso | March 27, 2013

Google search

Google search

The mother of all search engines.

Posted by: motso | December 4, 2012

A BRIEF HISTORY OF EVOLUTION OF KANNADA SCRIPTS

 

The Kannada script or the Kannada Lipi is basically derived from the ancient script of Brahmi.

 

There was an off-shoot from the original Brahmi script during the early 3rd century BC; this off-shoot gradually was developed as the script for Proto-Kannada. During the 4th century AD this script developed into the Kadamba script which again was derived as the Old Kannada script that existed till the 10th century AD. It is this Old Kannada script that is the mother of the modern day Kannada and Telugu scripts. So, it can be said that both Telugu and Kannada scripts have evolved from the same base of the ancient Brahmi script.

 

 

 

Kannada script is also used to write some of the other South Indian languages such as Kodava, Konkani and Tulu. Apart from the Devanagri script it is the script used to denote the second highest number of other languages. There is a historic evidence of Kannada being used in writing Badaga language of the Nilgiri region and also the Konkani in the Goa region where the script was named as Goykanadi. The present day Telugu script was derived from the Old Kannada script between the 11th and 14th century AD.

Contact

http://www.indianscripts.com/Articles/A-BRIEF-HISTORY-OF-EVOLUTION-OF-KANNADA-SCRIPTS.html

Posted by: motso | November 27, 2012

RELATIONSHIP OF KANNADA WITH OTHER LANGUAGES:

 

Linguists opine that there at least 5000 languages being used in different parts of the world, in India itself we find nearly about 1000 different languages. Some languages have a huge user base exceeding a hundred million while some others have only a few hundred speakers. A language cannot always be independent or remain static. Most of the flourishing languages of today have undergone drastic modifications during the course of their growth, have gained from their interaction with the other languages, have borrowed and lent words with other languages that have come into their contact and have stood the ravages of time. Such an interaction builds a relationship among the different languages.

 

 

 

Kannada too has a relationship with many of the languages that have come into an interaction with it. This relationship could be due to the three major factors as follow-

 

1. Geographical factors: Geographically Kannada speaking region is covered by regions speaking Marathi in the north, Tamil and Malayalam in the south, Telugu in the east and Konkani and Tulu in the west. People in these regions have to interact with each other in their daily activities and thus have influenced the languages of each other.

 

Continue

http://www.indianscripts.com/Articles/RELATIONSHIP-OF-KANNADA-WITH-OTHER-LANGUAGES.html

Contact info@indianscripts.com for translating documents into Kannada

Posted by: motso | November 20, 2012

KANNADA FOLK SONGS

 

A systematic study of folk literature began in Karnataka in about 1783 when Col. Colin McKenzie, a western scholar who traveled in many parts of Karnataka and collected valuable information regarding folk stories, medicines, rituals, legends, mythology and other customs. It is because of his enormous efforts that the information which was primarily oral got transformed into a written form. Later, the German missionary worker and a scholar Rev. Ferdinand Kittel and J.F. Fleet made some extensive studies in Kannada folklore. Kittel has compiled a number of proverbs collected from the general public and Fleet collected a number of folk songs and compiled them in his series of articles entitled “A Selection of Kanarese Ballads” in 1885.

 

 Contact info@indianscripts.com for translating medical documents into Kannada

 

In recent years, scholars such as L.R.Hegde, M.M.Kalburgi, Aravinda Malagathi, Karim Khan and H.L.Nagegowda have made considerable research work in the field of folk literature. The Kannada University of Hampi, the Karnataka Sahithya Academy, the Janapada and Yakshagana Academy and Karnataka Janapada Trust have played an active role in studies with an anthropological approach for collecting a vast body of knowledge concerned with the life of common man and some marginalized communities.

Continue

http://www.indianscripts.com/Articles/KANNADA-FOLK-SONGS.html

Posted by: motso | November 20, 2012

Assamese script in image


Look at the sentense in Assamese. Rest are in English(if you say so!)

Posted by: motso | November 13, 2012

KANNADA PROVERBS AND APHORISMS

 

Kannada has a vast and rich source of proverbs; they are mostly on the colloquial language and their origin could be as old as the language itself. They are mostly the sayings derived from the past experiences of the people about life; the sayings are full of wisdom and are intended to guide us through our life. The reliability of them is so sure that there is one proverb on the proverbs themselves- Veda sulladaru gaade sullagadu (Proverbs can never be proved wrong; they prevail even when Vedas could go wrong). From the past they have flowed from mouth to mouth without being actually recorded in any form, it was only in the later part of 19th century that some western scholars such as Col. Colin McKenzie, Rev. Ferdinand Kittel and J.F.Fleet began researching and recording some of the treasures of folk arts with respect to different and particular regions and also unique to some of the tribes and marginalized communities in Karnataka. After this many following western as well as Kannada scholars such as Mathigatta Krishnamurthy, D.Javaregouda, H.L.Nagegouda, Simpi Linganna, M.M.Kalburgi, Madenuru Sanganna, Chandrashekara Kambara and many others who realized the richness, relevance and life fullness of proverbs , gradually began collecting the available proverbs among the common people and have framed them in their collections. Continue http://www.indianscripts.com/Articles/KANNADA-PROVERBS-AND-APHORISMS.html

Posted by: motso | November 12, 2012

9 points you wanted to know about Bengali(Bangla) Script

1.Bengali alphabet called Bangla horof is the writing system for the Bengali language.
2. Bengali script with variations is shared by Assamese.
3. Bengali alphabet is the basis for Meitei, Bishnupriya Manipuri, Kokborok, Garo and Mundari alphabets.
4.Bengali script has also been used to write the Sanskrit language in Eastern India.
5.Bengali is written from left to right
6. Bengali does not have distinct letter cases.
7, Bengali is recognizable by a distinctive horizontal line running along the tops of the letters that links them together
8. The Bengali script has a total of 11 vowel and 36 consonant s
9.. Each of vowel letter is called a স্বরবর্ণ shôrobôrno “vowel letter” and consonant letter is called ব্যঞ্জনবর্ণ bênjonbôrno “consonant letter”.

Source: http://www.amarbarnamala.org/

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